Coming in about half the cost of a Canon Battery Grip, this is a good value.

Disclaimer: B&H gave me this item for free in exchange for this review, I am being as fair as I can be with this review.

Find Prices on the Vello Battery Grip for the T2i/550D and T3i.

Coming in about half the cost of a Canon Battery Grip, this is a good value.See the video for all my thoughts on this grip.

I will mostly use this for time lapses; I like to keep my camera small when I shoot video.

For those that are wondering I filmed this on my old camcorder, and since it crushed the blacks too much I thought it would be fun to experiment with the Highlight/Shadows filter in Premiere Pro. Sorry if you don’t like the HDR look, I have to keep experimenting to get better.

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Vello T2i Battery Grip
Vello T2i Battery Grip

Find Prices Vello Battery Grip

18 comments

  • The first thing I noticed when viewing this video was that it was in stereo. Then I noticed the optics. Your t2i is far superior. By the way, you have been busy making videos the last few days. I’m impressed.

  • It does give the impression of a 1D or pro camera.

    I do agree the wheel on the grip has a plastic feel to it. But I usually have the camera in a landscape position when changing settings anyway.
    I used it to take photos of a small funnel cloud in Hodgenville, Ky this morning!

  • Thanks for the review Dave. I enjoyed watching it even though I already own one!

    It also helps with stabilization. The extra weight helps cut down on micro-vibrations significantly if your doing hand held shots without a rig.

    Also it does work with the t3i. But, not the t1i. I also keep mine on my camera all the time for glidecam work the extra weight also helps with stabilization.

  • I have this one on my t3i. It works flawlessly. One thing to add, for me anyways, is that the camera without the grip feels like a toy, and I can only get two of my fingers on the grip. This provides more grip and a better feel.
    Thanks for taking the time to review this item.

  • @Matt For those that are wondering I filmed this on my old camcorder, and since it crushed the blacks too much I thought it would be fun to experiment with the Highlight/Shadows filter in Premiere Pro. Sorry if you don’t like the HDR look, I have to keep experimenting to get better.

  • Following up on your question about the battery grip draining the battery when it’s left on and the camera is turned off. I accidentally made this mistake of leaving my grip turned on after I turned my camera off, and it drained the batteries. Just have to remember to turn it off.

  • @Dave Oh, that’s cool. It’s not that I didn’t like it, it was more that I would be gobsmacked if you said you’d managed to shoot this HDR (especially since you zoomed in). I was going to nag you for a tutorial 🙂

  • @Dave thought I would chip in with an opinion about power drain. The answer is ‘It depends on how the circuit is designed.’

    Most likely if you leave the grip in the ‘on’ position, then there will be a power drain. Assuming the circuit is fairly well designed (which may or may not be the case), this power drain will probably be unnoticeable. The only way to tell is to 1) measure it or 2) test it with 2 equal grips left for a few months.

    Think of it as something similar to the camera’s auto-off feature. The main switch is ‘on’ but the camera is in stand-by or in a ‘soft-off’ state. There are no hardware switches cutting the main power supply to the camera’s circuit, which means there will be a power drain.
    However with clever design the stand-by circuit can be made very small and its consumption can be made infinitely low.

    As with everything there are compromises, meaning that requirements such as limiting the amount of time that the camera takes to go from stand-by to full ‘on’ might imply a higher stand-by power drain.

    Hope this clears things up a bit.

    Cheers,
    Pedro.

  • I have a Vello battery grip for my 5DMKII. I’m not sure if anyone else has experienced this but sometimes if I hold the camera a certain way [haven’t been able to pinpoint the exact way that causes this], the battery grip losses it’s connection w/ the camera and the camera shuts off. HUGE problem for me since I use it to film live events. I’m not sure if I have a defective grip or if it’s just one of the downsides to a non-canon product.

  • When using the battery grip I found that if the camera battery indicator ever starts showing the batteries getting weak, say half charge, then you only have a few shots left.

    So you wont see the batteries drain, they go from full on the indicator to discharged really fast.

    But they last a long time before this happens.

  • Michael,

    The on/off switch on the Vello sticks out further than the Canon or Vivitar (for Canon) BG grips. You might be turning it off. I was. The other thing is the screws that hold the piece that inserts into the camera’s battery compartment start to strip. All 4 will eventually strip rendering your Vello Battery Grip garbage. Mine worked for 4 months.

  • @Jim, that’s what’s probably happening – the on/off switch issue is not what I’m dealing with..it’s more the battery grip disconnecting from the bottom of the camera, which causes the camera to shut off. Terrible news if this becomes a paper weight – I’ve had it for less than 3 months